Posts Tagged ‘HCI’

Informing and Performing: Investigating How Mediated Sociality Becomes Visible - July 21st, 2011

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Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to former Informatics grad student Dr. Sharon Xianghua Ding, Informatics faculty member Don Patterson and their coauthors Wendy Kellog and Thomas Erickson on having their paper,
‘Informing and Performing: Investigating How Mediated Sociality Becomes Visible’ accepted to Personal and Ubiquitous Computing (Springer journal).

Abstract: In the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and ubiquitous computing literature, making people’s presence and activities visible as a design approach has been extensively explored to enhance computer mediated interactions and collaborations. This process has developed under the rubrics of “awareness”, “social translucence”, “social activity indicators”, “social navigation”, etc. Although the name and details vary, the central ideas are similar. By making social presence and activities more visible or perceivable, they provide social context for members to make sense of situations and guide their activities more informatively and appropriately. In this work, we introduce a class of visualizations called social context displays, which use and share graphical representations to depict people’s presence and activity information with an explicit focus on groups. The aim of this work is to examine social context displays in use and contribute new abstractions for understanding how making social information more visible works in general. Through our first hand experience with user-centered design and empirical investigations of two social context displays in real settings, we uncovered not only how they provide social context to inform actions and decisions, but also how members perform and manage their self- and group-representations through the display. Drawing on Goffman’s performance framework, we provide a detailed description of how people react and respond to these two social context displays, and reconsider some of the broader issues associated with computer-mediated interactions such as privacy, context, and media richness.

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Posted: 7/21/11 5:00 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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LUCI is doing: Designing Development in India - May 5th, 2011

Designing Development in India

Designing Development in India

What has LUCI been up to recently?

Designing Development in India

“User experience” has its roots in technology design and HCI, but designers are now being called to bring methods such as usability, contextual inquiry, and personas to bear on problems such as safe water access, poverty, and even sanitation. Through detailed ethnography, this project asks, broadly, what are the cultural impacts and values of HCI. By examining a range of design practices in the Indian context – including rural and low-income participatory design, DIY and maker spaces to support creative practice, and contextual inquiry for development design problems – this project examines the cultural and epistemological commitments of design culture and methods. By studying design practice in India, we cast cast the competing meanings and values of user-centered design everywhere into sharp relief.

More info

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Posted: 5/5/11 10:00 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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Happy 30th Birthday Computer Mouse | InnovationNewsDaily - April 28th, 2011

mouse

mouse

LUCI gets some love from the press:
“After 30 Years, Computer Mouse Still Prevails”

via Happy 30th Birthday Computer Mouse | Three Decade Later the Mouse Still Trumps Multitouch Rivals | iPad and Kinect Can’t Compete | InnovationNewsDaily.

The world the mouse created

One cannot understand the success and longevity of the computer mouse without putting it in the context of the computing revolution it enabled. Before the mouse, users interacted with their computers by feeding in abstract punch cards or linguistically confusing lines of code words. The mouse transformed the computer into a visual device, thereby moving computing into the visual, immediate, “what you see is what you get” world that humans feel comfortable with.

“[The mouse] was a key development in the creation of graphic user interfaces,” said Donald Patterson, director of the Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction at the University of California, Irvine. “The mouse enabled long-term engagement with the screen, albeit indirectly, in a way that wasn’t particularly expensive and wasn’t prone to arm and hand fatigue.”

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Posted: 4/28/11 11:37 pm PDT by Add Your Comment
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LUCI members get many papers accepted by CHI 2011 - January 27th, 2011

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

The LUCI lab has had several papers accepted to CHI 2011. The list of accepted works was just released and includes the following by students, researchers, and faculty:

Full Papers:

Situating the Concern for Information Privacy through an Empirical Study of Responses to Video Recording by David Nguyen (LUCI Ph.D.), Aurora Bedford and Alex Bretana (Informatics undergrads) and Gillian R. Hayes (LUCI faculty)

Unpacking Exam-Room Computing: Negotiating Computer-Use in Patient-Physician Interactions by Yunan Chen (LUCI faculty), Victor Ngo and Sidney Harrison (Informatics Masters students) and Victoria Duong (UCI undergrad).

Comparing Activity Theory with Distributed Cognition for Video Analysis: Beyond “Kicking the Tires.” by Eric Baumer (former LUCI post-doc) and Bill Tomlinson (LUCI faculty)

Infrastructures for low-cost laptop use in Mexican schools
Ruy Cervantes (Informatics Ph.D.), Mark Warschauer (Ed. Dept.), Bonnie Nardi (LUCI Faculty), and Nithya Sambasivan (Informatics Ph.D.)

Designing a Phone Broadcasting System for Urban Sex Workers in India
Nithya Sambasivan (Informatics Ph.D.) and Ed Cutrell (Microsoft)

Classroom-Based Assistive Technology: Collective Use of Interactive Visual Schedules by Students with Autism
Meg Cramer (LUCI Ph.D.), Sen Hirano (LUCI M.S.), Monica Tentori (UABC), Michael Yeganyan (LUCI M.S.), and Gillian R. Hayes (LUCI Faculty)

Homebrew Databases: Complexities of Everyday Information Management in Nonprofit Organizations
Amy Voida (Informatics PostDoc), Ellie Harmon (LUCI Ph.D.), Ban Al-Ani (Informatics Faculty)

Why Do I Keep Interrupting Myself?: Environment, Habit and Self-Interruption
Laura Dabbish (CMU), Gloria Mark (Informatics Faculty), Victor Gonzalez, (ITAM)

Refraining from Technological Intervention by by Eric Baumer (former LUCI post-doc) and Six Silberman (former LUCI Ph.D. Student)

Congratulations
Alex, Aurora, Bill, David, Eric, Gillian, Sidney, Six, Victor, Yunan, Ruy, Bonnie, Nithya, Meg, Sen, Monica, Michael, Amy, Ellie, Ban, and Gloria!

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Posted: 1/27/11 7:36 pm PDT by Add Your Comment
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Disability Studies as a Source of Critical Inquiry for the Field of Assistive Technology - October 28th, 2010

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Informatics faculty member Gillian Hayes and collaborators just received a SIGACCESS best paper award for a paper published in ASSETS 2010, the International ACM Conference on Conference on Computers and Accessibility, going on in Orlando, Florida. Their paper, “Disability Studies as a Source of Critical Inquiry for the Field of Assistive Technology” comes out of the research they’ve been doing on HCI for individuals with disabilities.

Abstract:
Disability studies and assistive technology are two related fields that have long shared common goals–understanding the experience of disability and identifying and addressing relevant issues. Despite these common goals, there are some important differences in what professionals in these fields consider problems, perhaps related to the lack of connection between the fields. To help bridge this gap, we review some of the key literature in disability studies. We present case studies of two research projects in assistive technology and discuss how the field of disability studies influenced that work, led us to identify new or different problems relevant to the field of assistive technology, and helped us to think in new ways about the research process and its impact on the experiences of individuals who live with disability. We also discuss how the field of disability studies has influenced our teaching and highlight some of the key publications and publication venues from which our community may want to draw more deeply in the future.

Congratulations Gillian!

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Posted: 10/28/10 12:57 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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Javascript demo of a Bubble Cursor - September 23rd, 2010

Bubble Cursor Demo

Bubble Cursor Demo

See this paper for more info: The bubble cursor: enhancing target acquisition by dynamic resizing of the cursor’s activation area

Click here for the demo

Abstract of paper that explains what this is about:

“We present the bubble cursor – a new target acquisition technique based on area cursors. The bubble cursor improves upon area cursors by dynamically resizing its activation area depending on the proximity of surrounding targets, such that only one target is selectable at any time. We also present two controlled experiments that evaluate bubble cursor performance in 1D and 2D target acquisition tasks, in complex situations with multiple targets of varying layout densities. Results show that the bubble cursor significantly outperforms the point cursor and the object pointing technique [8], and that bubble cursor performance can be accurately modeled and predicted using Fitts’ law.”

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Posted: 9/23/10 9:20 pm PDT by Add Your Comment
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Sikuli replays GUI macros using computer vision - June 10th, 2010

Coming out of MIT’s CSAIL is a gui-macro-recording program, called Sikuli, that uses computer vision algorithms to replay GUI scripts. Because it doesn’t hook into anything except the screen rendering subsystem, you don’t have to know AppleScript or any other API to make it work. The computer vision algorithm is tolerant of the click-target moving around the screen and the researchers claim it is somewhat tolerant to changes in the visual appearance of the click-target as well.

It is based on Jython, and available for downloading on Mac (yeah!) and Windows. I think this is one of those programs that if you need it, you need it badly!

This is one of a series of HCI projects that are coming out now which mod the UI using the raw pixels as a guide. The other one I’ve seen recently is by James Fogarty and crew at UW called Prefab. Videos for both systems are embedded below.




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Posted: 6/10/10 4:53 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Nithya Sambasivan Advances to Candidacy - March 3rd, 2010

Beneficiary User

Beneficiary User

Congratulations to Informatics Ph.D. Student Nithya Sambasivan for passing her advancement to candidacy exam!

Committee: Bonnie Nardi (chair), Ed Cutrell (Microsoft), Bill Maurer, Donald Patterson, Alladi Venkatesh

Intermediated Technology Use in Developing Communities

Abstract: We describe a prevalent mode of information access in low-income communities of the developing world intermediated interactions. They enable persons for whom technology is inaccessible due to non-literacy, lack of technology-operation skills, financial constraints and so on, to benefit from technologies through digitally skilled users thus, expanding the reach of technologies. Reporting the results of our ethnography in two urban slums of Bangalore, India, we present three distinct intermediated interactions: inputting intent into the device in proximate enabling, interpretation of device output in proximate translation, and both input of intent and interpretation of output in surrogate usage. We present some requirements and challenges in interface design of these interactions and explain how they are different from direct interactions. We then explain the broader effects of these interactions on low-income communities, and present some implications for design.

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Posted: 3/3/10 10:34 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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Twitter, Sensors and UI: Robust Context Modeling for Interruption Management - March 2nd, 2010

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to Informatics Master’s Student Justin Tang and Informatics Faculty Member Don Patterson on having their paper,Twitter, Sensors and UI: Robust Context Modeling for Interruption Management accepted to UMAP 2010.

Abstract: In this paper, we present the results of a two-month field study of fifteen people using a software tool designed to model changes in a user’s availability. The software uses status update messages, as well as sensors, to detect changes in context. When changes are identified using a novel Kullback-Leibler Divergence algorithm, users are prompted to broadcast their current contexts to their social networks. The user interface method by which the alert is delivered is evaluated in order to minimize the impact on the user’s work flow. By carefully coupling both algorithms and user interfaces, interruptions made by the software tool can be made valuable to the user.

Congratulations Justin and Don!

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Posted: 3/2/10 8:39 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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A Case Study in Designing for African AIDS Orphan Care Communities - December 18th, 2009

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to Informatics faculty members Don Patterson and Susan Sim, and former Informatics grad student Tosin Aiyelokun on having their paper,
‘Overcoming Blind Spots in Interaction Design: A Case Study in Designing for African AIDS Orphan Care Communities’ accepted to the Journal of Information Technologies & International Development.

Abstract: “The process of designing technological systems for the developing world is a challenging task. In a project that we undertook in the summer of 2007 using an iterative design process, we attempted to develop delay-tolerant networking technology on mobile phones to support workers at AIDS orphanages in Zambia and South Africa. Despite extensive preparations and research, we found that conditions on the ground were radically different from what we had anticipated, and we had to quickly re-group and redefine our strategic goals. This experience made us realize that, for this type of design, resiliency and contingency planning were the most valuable tools in our interaction design toolbox. In response to changing conditions, we rapidly prototyped a different mobile telephony application called Nomatic*AID that provides a feedback loop among donors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and field workers. In this paper, we reflect on the redirection of our work once we reached our field site and our resulting acceptance of design blind spots. We present lessons we learned to help practitioners meet their goals in the presence of considerable and obvious design distance.”

Get a copy of this paper here: http://itidjournal.org/itid/article/view/424/192

Congratulations Don, Susan and Tosin!

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Posted: 12/18/09 4:22 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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