Posts Tagged ‘design’

Informing and Performing: Investigating How Mediated Sociality Becomes Visible - July 21st, 2011

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to former Informatics grad student Dr. Sharon Xianghua Ding, Informatics faculty member Don Patterson and their coauthors Wendy Kellog and Thomas Erickson on having their paper,
‘Informing and Performing: Investigating How Mediated Sociality Becomes Visible’ accepted to Personal and Ubiquitous Computing (Springer journal).

Abstract: In the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and ubiquitous computing literature, making people’s presence and activities visible as a design approach has been extensively explored to enhance computer mediated interactions and collaborations. This process has developed under the rubrics of “awareness”, “social translucence”, “social activity indicators”, “social navigation”, etc. Although the name and details vary, the central ideas are similar. By making social presence and activities more visible or perceivable, they provide social context for members to make sense of situations and guide their activities more informatively and appropriately. In this work, we introduce a class of visualizations called social context displays, which use and share graphical representations to depict people’s presence and activity information with an explicit focus on groups. The aim of this work is to examine social context displays in use and contribute new abstractions for understanding how making social information more visible works in general. Through our first hand experience with user-centered design and empirical investigations of two social context displays in real settings, we uncovered not only how they provide social context to inform actions and decisions, but also how members perform and manage their self- and group-representations through the display. Drawing on Goffman’s performance framework, we provide a detailed description of how people react and respond to these two social context displays, and reconsider some of the broader issues associated with computer-mediated interactions such as privacy, context, and media richness.

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Posted: 7/21/11 5:00 pm UTC by Make the First Comment
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GroceryTime wins Butterworth Competition - June 7th, 2011

GroceryTime check

GroceryTime award check

Congrats to Boaz Grudin and team for winning $5000.00 in this year’s Butterworth Competition.

Our dean, Hal Stern described the competition this way:

This year’s competition had 16 teams enter with 8 making it through to the final stage of product demonstration. The winning team developed GroceryTime, a mobile app that lets grocery shoppers discover the best products in the grocery store. The members were Jackie Doong, Boaz Gurdin, and Arthur Valadares. They were mentored by alum David Cheng of our Leadership Council. Their prize is $5000 and 6 months rent for space in the Irvine Incubation Center.

Here I’d like to thank Ramesh Jain and [Informatics faculty] Crista Lopes for their help in developing this year’s Butterworth Competition. Several faculty served as team mentors (Ramesh, Don Patterson, Judy Olson, Dan Frost) and I’d like to thank them as well. Finally I’d like to recognize the efforts of Kristin Huerth who put in a great deal of time and did a great job of keeping the competition going until its successful conclusion.

Our hope is to start the Butterworth Competition early in the academic year next Fall. This would enable our teams to join up with others on campus for the Business School’s business plan competition if they desire. If you would like to participate next year (as a mentor, judge, or just to help organize), please contact Kristin Huerth at khuerth@ics.uci.edu.

Thanks.


First Place Prize: $5,000
*GroceryTime*
Team Members: Jackie Doong, Boaz Gurdin, Arthur Valadares
Mentor: David Cheng

Project Description:
GroceryTime is a mobile app that lets grocery shoppers discover the best products in the grocery store. Today grocery shoppers face a paradox of choice: the abundance in grocery stores is at once gratifying and overwhelming. GroceryTime assists shoppers in two main ways: we help users decide what to buy, and give food connoisseurs a place to share their knowledge with friends and the larger food community. Users can scan barcodes to quickly read and write reviews. In addition to user reviews, brands and grocery stores can advertise directly to shoppers, influencing their buying decision at the point of sale. With GroceryTime, a tasteful life is a barcode scan away!


Second Place Prize: $3,500

*AntColony*
Team Members: Azia Foster, Hiroe Ono, Garrett Kim
Mentor: Professor Don Patterson

Seon is an android and web-based application designed to let UCI students define their community for others. Using GPS technology, Seon is able to pin point a multitude of locations, filter them, and show them in real time using the phone’s camera. Users can use this to find desired location, look up operational hours, or discover a new local place.


Third Place Prize: $1,500

*Ubiquity*
Team Members: Alberto Pareja-Lecaros, Ankita Raturi, Nathan Fulton
Mentor: Professor Ramesh Jain

Project Description:
Ubiquity is a private networking client that delivers all your digital content from any device, anywhere, anytime. It offers a Distributed Effortless Workspace (DEW) that gives user’s constant, uninterrupted access to all their files. The DEW connects to a networking infrastructure that seamlessly integrates the user’s digital content into a common Workspace, allowing them to access their files through either a web client or a Ubiquity client installed on any of their devices. Ubiquity also features Implicit Version Control, giving users the ability to pull up previous versions of the same file at any time. Ubiquity will change the way people experience their digital content.


A special thank you to:
SPONSORS
Paul Butterworth, B.S. ’74, M.S. ’81
Ilie Ardelean, B.S. ’96
Google
Yahoo!

MENTORS
Ilie Ardelean, B.S. ’96
Sherman Chen, B.S. ’89, Health Care Legal Services
David Cheng, B.S. ’91, Program Director, Healthcare Products & Solutions, IBM
Dan Frost, Lecturer, Bren:ICS
John Herpy, B.S. ’85, Boeing
Ramesh Jain, Bren Professor, Information and Computer Science, Bren:ICS
Zack Ji, B.S. ’07, Vocado
Greg Moulton, B.S. ’82
Judy Olson, Bren Professor, Information and Computer Science, Bren:ICS
Don Patterson, Assistant Professor, Informatics, Bren:ICS

JUDGES
Greg Bolcer, B.S. ’89, Ph.D. ’98, CTO and Founder, Kerosene and a Match
Matthew Jenusaitis, President & CEO, OCTANe
Kevin Kinsey, CEO, Netreo
Roger Lloyd, CMO, Immerz,
Brian Roach, Principal Consultant & CEO, Evolve Partners Inc.,
Bob Romney, Chair, Leadership Council, Bren:ICS

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Posted: 6/7/11 4:22 pm UTC by Make the First Comment
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Supporting the Transition from Hospital to Home for Premature Infants… - May 23rd, 2011

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to Informatics faculty members Gillian Hayes and Don Patterson, their collaborator Mohan Singh (in Ireland!), and UCI medical school faculty, students and staff, Dan Cooper, Dana Gravem and Julia Rich on having their paper,
‘Supporting the Transition from Hospital to Home for Premature Infants Using Integrated Mobile Computing and Sensor Support’ accepted to Personal and Ubiquitous Computing (Springer journal).

Abstract: This paper reports on the requirements for, design of, and preliminary evaluation of a novel pervasive healthcare system for supporting the care of premature infants as they transition from hospital to home. In support of this system, we report the results of gesture sensing in a clinical setting and of interviews and focus groups with caregivers and clinicians who are involved in the post natal transition to the home. From these results, we developed prototype systems for monitoring and tracking observations of behavioral and health-related data in the home, including both a mobile-phone based capture and access system for caregivers, a sensing platform and an activity-recognition algorithm for automatically documenting infant movement. We describe the results of preliminary trials of both systems with an emphasis on the synergistic importance of bridging this transition. The results of these trials indicate that clinically relevant monitoring can be accomplished in the home, but there is still more to do to integrate these approaches into a comprehensive monitoring system for this population.

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Posted: 5/23/11 9:00 am UTC by Make the First Comment
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Hackerspace hosts inaugural Arduino workshop - May 11th, 2011

Arduino Workshop

Arduino Workshop

Last night the LUCI lab had a terrific turnout for an Arduino hacking workshop.  About 20 people including undergraduates, graduate students, researchers and faculty turned out to learn how to program this popular microcontroller.  The basic goal of the workshop was for everyone to create a device which measured an input (light, sound, pressure) and do something in response (beep, light up, tweet, etc.).  There was a little bit of trepidation at first as most of the participants had to trade their software coding skills for wires and breadboards, but once the pizza arrived everything got easier.

This workshop was run by undergraduate student Vahan Hartooni and sponsored by the LUCI lab’s “hackerspace”, which is a new direction that we are undertaking as a result of a Multidisciplinary Design Program (MDP) grant. The grant program is a collaboration between the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) with the following aspirations:

“Under the personal guidance of UCI faculty co-mentors, students will gain first-hand experience and training in state-of-the-art facilities and techniques. This program is designed to help students develop the multidisciplinary skills and knowledge that will propel them into graduate studies or careers in fields that explore the connections between different concentrations.Participants will demonstrate the results of their work at the UCI Undergraduate Research Symposium in May and at additional demonstration events sponsored by Calit2.”

This grant which was spearheaded by undergraduate students (including Vahan Hartooni and Nick LaJeunesse) and subsequently helped along with a little grant writing experience by Informatics faculty member Don Patterson, Informatics Research Scientist/Artist-in-Residence Garnet Hertz and Film & Media Studies faculty member Peter Krapp, was instrumental in last night’s program.

For more information about how you can hack, or about upcoming programs, contact the space at hackerspace@ics.uci.edu.

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Posted: 5/11/11 4:58 pm UTC by Make the First Comment
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LUCI is doing: Designing Development in India - May 5th, 2011

Designing Development in India

Designing Development in India

What has LUCI been up to recently?

Designing Development in India

“User experience” has its roots in technology design and HCI, but designers are now being called to bring methods such as usability, contextual inquiry, and personas to bear on problems such as safe water access, poverty, and even sanitation. Through detailed ethnography, this project asks, broadly, what are the cultural impacts and values of HCI. By examining a range of design practices in the Indian context – including rural and low-income participatory design, DIY and maker spaces to support creative practice, and contextual inquiry for development design problems – this project examines the cultural and epistemological commitments of design culture and methods. By studying design practice in India, we cast cast the competing meanings and values of user-centered design everywhere into sharp relief.

More info

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Posted: 5/5/11 10:00 am UTC by Make the First Comment
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LUCI is doing: Multi-Sited Design - May 4th, 2011

Multi-Sited Design

Multi-Sited Design

What has LUCI been up to recently?

Multi-Sited Design

Ideas about technology are also ideas about culture and people. When researchers and designers talk in terms of “free culture” and “open innovation,” their discourse shapes not only new ways of building technology, but new ways of relating to social and political structures. We have been exploring this through ethnographic research in a technology innovation lab in Shanghai, China, which positions its work at the intersections of Chinese Internet counterculture, international maker and hacker communities, digital art and creative commons. We ask how ideas of free culture and open innovation are mobilized as part of a conversation about technology design, Chinese modernity, innovation and do-it-yourself science that extends across Shanghai, Silicon Valley and Europe.

More info

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Posted: 5/4/11 10:00 am UTC by Make the First Comment
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“Hi Kiosk! Help me plz. Performative interactions in a restaurant” - September 14th, 2010

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to Informatics grad student, Vrishti Gulati and Informatics faculty member Bonnie Nardi on having their paper, “Hi Kiosk! Help me plz. Performative interactions in a restaurant.”, accepted to the Ubicomp 2010- Designing for Performative Interactions in Public Spaces Workshop

Abstract:The paper explores issues of performance and identity in interactions with a self service kiosk in a fast food restaurant. This is studied in context of a youth populated site-a fast food restaurant at a University Campus. I conducted ethnography in a Jack in the Box restaurant, a popular American chain. The focus is looking at performative aspects in social and public settings. All interactions with the kiosk—the choice of using it to order food, glances, playful interactions, and looks when others are using it— are viewed as exhibits of performance. Even non-interactions and ignorance of the kiosk display an aspect of performance.

Congratulations Vrishti and Bonnie!

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Posted: 9/14/10 11:57 pm UTC by Add Your Comment
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Lilly, Melissa, and Paul receive Best Paper Award for `Shopping for Sharpies in Seattle` - August 22nd, 2010

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Informatics Ph.D. student Lilly Irani and Informatics faculty members Melissa Mazmanian and Paul Dourish just received the Best Paper award of ICIC 2010, the International Conference on Intercultural Collaboration, going on in Copenhagen. Their paper, “”Shopping for Sharpies in Seattle: Mundane Infrastructures of Transnational Design” comes out of the research they’ve been doing on design collaborations across India and the US.

Abstract:
In this paper, we describe the importance of mundane tools for design practitioners in India working with Euro-American clients. Our findings are based on a 7-week ethnographic study of a design firm based in Delhi, India. We analyze some highly-valued tools and software, such as post-its, as infrastructures with both practical and symbolic functions. These infrastructures are made meaningful in the shared practices of a transnational but primarily Euro-American design community. Designers in India employ a number of strategies we call “infrastructure work” to be able to participate as designers in this mold.

Congratulations Lilly, Melissa and Paul!

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Posted: 8/22/10 4:13 am UTC by Add Your Comment
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Lilly Irani Receives Fulbright Scholarship - April 21st, 2010

Fulbright LogoCongratulations to Informatics graduate student Lilly Irani on receiving a Fulbright Scholarship for her research in India on transnational technological design practice. The Fulbright award is given from money appropriated by the U.S. Congress and awarded by a 12 member, presidentially appointed board. More on the program can be found here.

Congratulations Lilly!

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Posted: 4/21/10 10:38 am UTC by Add Your Comment
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CACM blog: Thinking Globally, Thinking Locally: Infrastructures for Collaboration - February 11th, 2010

Someone designing something on a computer

Photo courtesy of fernandopelillo

Lilly Irani was recently profiled (in a good way) on the CACM Blog, which is located here:
Thinking Globally, Thinking Locally: Infrastructures for Collaboration | Computers And Society | Communications of the ACM

An excerpt follows:

“Lilly studies infrastructures necessary to support design teams that operate out of India and work with clients who are also in Europe and the United States. Lilly started with seven weeks of immersive fieldwork observing a Delhi-based design team. She lived in the homes of her participants and went to work with them daily. As a researcher, she mostly observed, but she also helped with small tasks around the office, shopping for office supplies and tools, and photographing and filming user research done by the firm. Something Lilly found in her initial fieldwork is that short digital films (e.g. posted on vimeo) can help in communicating with foreign design research clients. In the words of Lilly, “You can post films on vimeo and really engage someone 12,000 miles away in a way that you can’t with a document or a phone call. If a picture is worth a 1000 words, a film is worth 10000 and it’s a lot more likely, if the film is good, that the intended viewer (the client) will watch it all the way through. “

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Posted: 2/11/10 2:14 pm UTC by Make the First Comment
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