Archive for February, 2012

Garnet goes viral - February 24th, 2012

LUCI Artist-in-Residence/Research Scientist Garnet Hertz started the latest viral meme “What People Think I Do/ What I Really Do”.

Don’t believe me, then believe knowyourmeme.com or hyperalleric.

Here’s Garnet’s original:

Garnet starts a meme

Garnet starts a meme

He’s interviewed by his hometown news radio also.

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Posted: 2/24/12 1:49 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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Adaptation as Design: Learning from an EMR deployment Study - February 22nd, 2012

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to LUCI grad student Sun Young Park and faculty Yunan Chen on having their paper titled, “Adaptation as Design: Learning from an EMR deployment Study” accepted to CHI 2012.

We conducted an observational study in an Emergency Department (ED) to examine the adaptation process after deploying an Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system. We investigated how EMR was adapted to the complex clinical work environment and how doctors and nurses engaged in the adaptation process. In this paper, we present three cases in which ED clinicians designed workarounds in order to adapt to the new work practice. Our findings reveal a rich picture of ED clinicians’ active reinterpretation and modification of their work practice through their engagement with the system-in-use and its organizational and physical context. These findings call for the adaptation period in designing a socio-technical system in healthcare settings to be critically considered as an active end-user design process, a negotiating process, and a re-routinized process.

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Posted: 2/22/12 9:00 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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Bridging Clinical and Non-clinical Health Practices: Opportunities and Challenges - February 21st, 2012

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to LUCI faculty Yunan Chen, post-doc Karen Cheng and grad students Sun Young Park on having their workshop proposal titled, “Bridging Clinical and Non-clinical Health Practices: Opportunities and Challenges” accepted to the CHI 2012 program.

There has been a growing interest in the HCI community to study Health, with particular focus in understanding healthcare practices and designing technologies to support and to enhance these practices. A majority of current health studies in HCI have focused on either clinical settings, such as hospitals and clinics, or non-clinical spaces, like patients’ homes and senior centers. Yet, there has been little work investigating how patient care in clinical and non- clinical settings connect with each other. Building on the illness trajectory concept, this workshop aims to explore the interplay between, and the challenges and opportunities in designing healthcare technologies for bridging the clinical and the non-clinical settings, as well as their impact on the continuum of patient care

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Posted: 2/21/12 7:53 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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The effects of EMR deployment on doctors’ work practices - February 13th, 2012

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to grad students Sun Young Park, So Young Lee and LUCI faculty Yunan Chen on having their paper titled, “The effects of EMR deployment on doctors’ work practices: A qualitative study in the emergency department of a teaching hospital” accepted to The International Journal of Medical Informatics!

Results: The use of the EMR in the ED resulted in both direct and indirect effects on ED doctors’ work practices. It directly influenced the ED doctors’ documentation process: (i) increasing documentation time four to five fold, which in turn significantly increased the number of incomplete charts, (ii) obscuring the distinction between residents’ charting inputs and those of attendings, shifting more documentation responsibilities to the residents, and (iii) leading to the use of paper notes as documentation aids to transfer information from the patient bedside to the charting room. EMR use also had indirect consequences: it increased the cognitive burden of doctors, since they had to remember multiple patients’ data; it aggravated doctors’ multi-tasking due to flexibility in the system use allowing more interruptions; and it caused ED doctors’ work to become largely stationary in the charting room, which further contributed to reducing doctors’ time with patients and their interaction with nurses.

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Posted: 2/13/12 9:52 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Designing Online Games for Real-life Relationships - February 7th, 2012

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to former grad student Yong Ming Kow, and LUCI faculty Yunan Chen on having their paper titled, “Designing Online Games for Real-life Relationships: Examining QQ Farm in Intergenerational Play” accepted to CSCW 2012!

Abstract: Intergenerational players are online game players of different generations within an extended family. We investigated intergenerational play between older parents and their adult children in the popular Chinese social networking game QQ Farm. We identified game features that encourage intergenerational play. To do this, we conducted online observations and semi-structured interviews with nine pairs of Chinese parents and their adult children. The results of this study suggest that an online game for intergenerational play needs to consider a range of factors, including social and occupational responsibilities, gaming interests, and gaming expertise among extended family members. The data suggests that intergenerational online games may generally benefit from the following features: (1) low entry barrier, (2) appealing game theme, (3) online interactions that extend real-life relationships, (4) low time commitment, and (5) asynchronous play. We have also found features which may have unique appeal to Chinese intergenerational gamers.

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Posted: 2/7/12 4:52 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Loosely Formed Patient Care Teams - February 6th, 2012

Moleskins and Pens

Photo courtesy of paulworthington

Congratulations to grad students Soyoung Lee, Sun Young Park, and LUCI faculty Yunan Chen on having their paper titled, “Loosely Formed Patient Care Teams: Communication Challenges and Technology Design” accepted to CSCW 2012!

Abstract: We conducted an observational study to investigate nurses’ communication behaviors in an Emergency Department (ED). Our observations reveal unique collaboration practices exercised by ED staff, which we term as “loosely formed team collaboration.” Specifically, ED patient care teams are dynamically and quickly assembled upon patient arrival, wherein team members engage in interdependent and complex care activities. The responsible care team then disassembles when a patient leaves the ED. The coordination mechanism required for these work practices challenges nurses’ communication processes, often increasing breakdown susceptibility. Our analysis of the ED nurses’ communication behaviors and use of communication channels highlights the importance of maintaining team awareness and supporting role-based communication. This points to the need for explicit efforts to coordinate tasks and informative interruptions. These findings call for the design of future communication technologies to meet the needs of loosely formed collaborative environments to provide team-based communication, lightweight feedback, and information transparency.

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Posted: 2/6/12 6:52 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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