Archive for February, 2006

PERVASIVE 2006: Registration now open - February 28th, 2006

Register Now for Pervasive 2006!
Registration is now open for this years exciting conference to be held
in Dublin 7-10th May.

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Posted: 2/28/06 5:28 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Employment Opportunities in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning at JPL - February 27th, 2006

The Artificial Intelligence Group and the Machine Learning and Instrument Autonomy Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology are seeking candidates at the BA/BS, MA/MS and PhD level to work on fundamental research problems leading to unique software applications in spacecraft autonomy, scientific data analysis, mission operations automation, and onboard analysis for real-time decisions. Openings in the following areas of research and development exist: planning & scheduling, multi-agent systems, operations research, pattern recognition, data mining, machine learning, and data fusion. Responsibilities for these openings range from research program development to software design and development.

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Posted: 2/27/06 5:20 pm PDT by Add Your Comment
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‘Car-chase capital’ deploys new weapon — GPS gum balls - February 15th, 2006

” LOS ANGELES, California (AP) — The car chase capital of the world is going high-tech to end dangerous pursuits across Southern California.

Police Chief William J. Bratton unveiled a strange new weapon in the police department’s strategy to halt high-speed pursuits — adhesive darts with a global positioning system that are fired at fleeing cars by police.”

Full Story (original link went down)

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Posted: 2/15/06 5:49 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Cell-Phone Information Wand - February 14th, 2006

‘Point And Search’ Technology For Cell Phones Hits Japan (original link went down)

“San Francisco-based GeoVector said users can simply point their cell phones at 700,000 buildings, retailers, restaurants, banks or historical sites throughout Japan to retrieve information.”

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Posted: 2/14/06 5:00 pm PDT by Add Your Comment
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Coffin to cradle: Identity, absence, and the quest for certainty - February 10th, 2006

This is the video capture of Michael Curry from the Geography Department at UCLA, addressing the Friday Informatics Seminar. The original announcement of the talk can be found here.

The copyright for this talk remains with Dr. Curry. He has given LUCI permission to distribute it via this website.

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Posted: 2/10/06 3:00 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Coffin to cradle: Identity, absence, and the quest for certainty - February 10th, 2006

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Multicast file Open this with Quicktime Player.

If anyone tried this, could you please provide some feedback to us about how it worked? You can do this in the comments section or by emailing Prof. Patterson at djp3@ics.uci.edu.

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Posted: 2/10/06 2:45 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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Coffin to cradle: Identity, absence, and the quest for certainty - February 10th, 2006

The speaker at this week’s seminar will be Michael Curry from the Geography Department at UCLA. Michael has worked extensively on the geographical implications of information technology, including digital representations of space, privacy, geographical information systems, geodemographics, and more.

Abstract:

One important theme in recent schemes for the identification of terrorists and other threatening individuals has been the desire for certainty, the desire to avoid letting potential miscreants slip between the cracks. Common among those schemes has been a belief that what is needed is not the creation of statistical profiles but rather the mapping into the past of an individual’s actions, and thereby the disclosure of the intersections of those actions with the actions of others. Resting in part on the newest of spatially- enabled technologies, they see certainty as guaranteed where there is, in principle, an unbroken chain from the coffin back to the cradle.

Often embodying sophisticated data-mining systems, these schemes have nonetheless been little theorized. But they in fact share much with recent work in sociology, philosophy, and geography, where in each case the possibility of “following people (or objects) around” has been promoted as basic to the possibility of certain knowledge, and where absence becomes as important as presence.

The Informatics Seminar is held in ICS2 136 at 3pm, followed by a happy hour at 4pm. See you there!

This talk will be videocaptured, broadcast live, and archived via this blog. 15 minutes before the live broadcast we will publish a multicast “.spd” file which will allow a quicktime client to tune into the event. This is the first attempt at a live broadcast for us, so consider this a beta test.

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Posted: 2/10/06 8:00 am PDT by Make the First Comment
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Symantec’s University Programming Competition - February 7th, 2006

eWeek and Symantec have teamed for our first university programming competition to encourage creativity and innovation. The entrant who builds the most efficient and robust virtual organism will win the competition.

To enter you need to be over 18 and a student at a U.S. university. First prize is $10,000. More details here.

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Posted: 2/7/06 5:00 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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The Culture of Information: Ubiquitous Computing and Representations of Reality - February 3rd, 2006

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Abstract:

In the late 1980s, Weiser suggested that the ages of mainframe and personal computing would give way to a third wave of “ubiquitous computing,” a confluence of embedded physical computing and pervasive wireless networking. Indeed, ubiquitous computing has become a dominant paradigm for computing research and an increasingly prevalent form for the delivery of information services. Ubiquitous computing reconfigures the relationship between people and the world around them. It does this by interpreting that world in terms of information. This is not a new phenomenon. Information systems research has, since its inception, been built upon a model of information as commodity, to be extracted, exchanged, moved, stored, and processed. The idea that the world is populated with information objects and artifacts is at the heart of the technological enterprise. However, in the context of ubiquitous computing, this model privileges certain models of spatial and environmental knowing while obscuring or devaluing others. In this talk, I will use ubiquitous computing as a lens through which to examine these concerns, and explore the consequences of the model of information as commodity.

This is a rebroadcast of a talk that Paul Dourish gave at the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics at Indiana University on Friday October 14th, 2005. Paul retains copyright over the material (Creative Commons). It was originally released by the Rob Kling School via this website.

The video can be obtained here.

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Posted: 2/3/06 5:49 pm PDT by Make the First Comment
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